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The Indie Next List (formerly Book Sense Picks) for children is a seasonal selection of eclectic new books chosen by independent booksellers.

Winter 2013

Fall 2012

Summer 2012

Spring 2012

Spring 2011

Winter 2011

Fall 2010

Summer 2010

Spring 2010

Winter 2009

Fall 2009

Summer 2009

Spring 2009

Winter 2008/2009

— Fall 2008

— Spring 2008

Fall 2007

— Summer 2007

Favorites of 2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top Ten

1. The Hunger Games
by Suzanne Collins (Scholastic)
“This compelling, page-turning futuristic novel takes readers into a world that pits teenagers against each other in a fight to the death for the glory and well-being of their district. But when Katniss discovers the young man from her district is in love with her, she is faced with either having to kill him to survive or sacrificing herself to save him.”
—David Richardson, The Blue Marble Bookstore, Fort Thomas, KY


2.
Graceling
by Kristin Cashore (Harcourt Children's Books)
“In a world where some people are born with extreme and often feared skills—called Graces—Katsa struggles for redemption from her own horrifying Grace, that of killing, and teams up with another young fighter to save their land from a corrupt king. Action-packed and featuring a strong, feisty girl.”
—Kristi Tiedt, Butterfly Books, De Pere, WI


3. Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes
by Mem Fox, Helen Oxenbury (illus.) (Harcourt Children's Books) “The winning combination of Mem Fox’s lilting text and Helen Oxenbury’s delightful illustrations make this book a perfect baby gift. What a lovely book to read with your baby in your lap!”
—Linda Ronberg, Linden Tree, Los Altos, CA

4.Inkdeath
by Cornelia Funke (The Chicken House)
“This book is a stunning conclusion to the Inkheart trilogy, which will keep readers up reading way past midnight. With surprising plot twists, exciting new characters, and terrifying new villains, readers will be thrilled to reenter Funke’s wonderful world.”
—Jessica Palacios, Once Upon a Time, Montrose, CA


5.
The Tomorrow Code
by Brian Falkner (Random House Books for Young Readers)
“Tane and Rebecca receive an SOS from the future sent from themselves! Can they follow their clues in time to save the world? Falkner’s story is fast-paced, exciting, and thought-provoking.”
—Cinda Meister, Booksmart, Morgan Hill, CA



6. Chains
by Laurie Halse Anderson (Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing)
“This is an incredible look at a little discussed topic—slavery during the Revolutionary War. When Isabel’s master dies, she and her sister, Ruth, are sold to Loyalists and shipped to New York City. The only thing that matters to Isabel is that she and Ruth stay together. But, when Ruth is sold in the middle of the night, Isabel does what it takes to find her again, even if it means spying for the rebels.”
—Cathy Berner, Blue Willow Bookshop, Houston, TX

7. Science Fair
by Dave Barry, Ridley Pearson (Disney Editions)
“Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson dazzle us again with a hilarious story about an 8th grade science fair gone awry, featuring Star Wars obsessed fans, henchmen from the country Kprshtskan. and a plot to take over the world. Can our hero save the day before time runs out?”
—Suzanna Hermans, Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck, NY

 

8.Fanny
by Holly Hobbie (Little Brown & Company)
“Fanny is a little girl who desperately wants the over-the-top doll that she can’t have; so, she makes her own. She struggles to accept her own creation until she finds a way to celebrate her unique new friend. A refreshingly sweet alternate to ‘girly-girl’ picture books.”
—Kelli Gleiner, Blue Manatee Children's Bookstore, Cincinnati, OH


9. Pretty Monsters: Stories
by Kelly Link, Shaun Tan (illus.) (Viking Juvenile)
“You’ll find a little bit of everything in this book, from a mother-daughter team of ghost collectors to a cult-like organization waiting for aliens to return to Earth. Kelly Link gives us great stories in this collection—a wonderful (and thought-provoking) read.”
—Samuel Morris Barker, Summer's Stories, Kendallville, IN

 

10. The Leanin' Dog
by K.A. Nuzum (Joanna Cotler)
“Dessa Dean hasn’t been able to make herself step off the porch of the Colorado mountain cabin she shares with her father since her mother died. Then, a big ‘fudge-colored’ dog arrives and things start to change. A beautifully written story about honoring the past and moving into the future, The Leanin’ Dog is a sure bet.”
—Trish Brown, Hooray for Books!, Alexandria, VA

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Ages 4 to 8

Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes
by Mem Fox, Helen Oxenbury (illus.) (Harcourt Children's Books) “The winning combination of Mem Fox’s lilting text and Helen Oxenbury’s delightful illustrations make this book a perfect baby gift. What a lovely book to read with your baby in your lap!”
—Linda Ronberg, Linden Tree, Los Altos, CA

A Perfect Season for Dreaming / Una temporada perfecta para soñar
by Benjamin Alire Sáenz, Esau Andrade Valencia (illus.) (Cinco Puntos Press)
“A Perfect Season for Dreaming is a wonderful counting story that celebrates the special bond between a grandfather and his granddaughter.”
—Fran Wilson, Colorado State Univ. Bookstore, Fort Collins, CO

ABC3D
by Marion Bataille (Roaring Brook Press)
“The way the alphabet comes alive in this innovative little treasure will blow you away! Sure to be enjoyed by all ages.”
—Angela K Sherrill, 57th Street Books, Chicago, IL

Charlie and Lola's I Am Not Sleepy and I Will Not Go to Bed Pop-Up
by Lauren Child, Corina Fletcher (designer) (Candlewick)
“This story of a big brother getting a sister to bed is great for both kids and grown-ups in this new edition featuring wonderful pop-ups.”
—Diana Portwood, Bob's Beach Books, Lincoln City, OR

Hanukkah Haiku
by Harriet Ziefert, Karla Gudeon (illus.) (Blue Apple Books)
“This is my new favorite Hanukkah picture book, presenting the holiday traditions with a new spin. Every page is filled with whimsical paintings worth framing, colors that swirl and whirl, and a haiku for each night of the holiday.”
—Victoria VanZile, Wild Rumpus, Minneapolis, MN

Her Mother's Face
by Roddy Doyle, Freya Blackwood (illus.) (Arthur A. Levine/Scholastic)
“Young Siobhan can’t recall what her mother looked like, but a chance meeting in the park helps her remember all the other wonderful things about her mom she has forgotten. Roddy Doyle has written a touching story of love, laughter, and loss, and the whimsical illustrations by Freya Blackwood are a perfect match.”
—Barb Bassett, The Red Balloon Bookshop, Saint Paul, MN

Hip Hop Speaks to Children: A Celebration of Poetry with a Beat
by Nikki Giovanni (ed.) (Sourcebooks Jabberwocky)
“This collection—with an accompanying CD—truly has the potential to change the way young children see poetry, as the intrinsic relationship between words and rhythm is amplified in a new groove. We can’t wait to share this with our neighborhood educators.”
—Angela Sherrill, 57th Street Books, Chicago, IL

Little Beauty
by Anthony Browne (Candlewick)
“A beautifully told story of a sad, lonely gorilla living in a zoo. Using sign language, he tells his keepers, ‘I want a friend,’ and the zookeepers give him a little kitten to care for. The illustrations express clear emotion in this perfect read for young children about friendship.”
—Kristi Tiedt, Butterfly Books, De Pere, WI

Louise, The Adventures of a Chicken
by Kate Dicamillo, Harry Bliss (illus.) (Joanna Cotler)
“Louise is a restless, not-so-chicken chicken that is searching for adventure. She leaves the coop to dance on a tightrope, battle pirates, and narrowly escape a misguided fortune teller. In the end, Louise finds that, after adventures, there is no place like home.”
—Barbara Davis, Butterfly Books, De Pere, WI

Mary Engelbreit's Nursery Tales: A Treasury of Children's Classics
by Mary Engelbreit (HarperCollins)
“Featuring illustrations by Mary Engelbreit, this is a beautiful collection of nursery tales that will make a delightful gift.”
—Rita F. Maggio, BookTowne, Manasquan, NJ

Millie in the Snow
by Alexander Steffensmeier (Walker Books for Young Readers)
“Moo-hoo! Madcap, mail-toting Millie is back with another hilarious adventure delivering holiday gifts with unexpected consequences. Once again, Steffensmeier delivers a charming tale beefed up with some of the best illustrations around, full of visual fun and puns.”
—Julie Shimada, Maria's Bookshop, Durango, CO

Pete & Pickles
by Berkeley Breathed (Philomel)
“If you’re a predictable, practical, and uncomplicated pig, the last thing you want to find is an elephant in your bedroom with a lampshade on his head. Breathed’s artwork and story go together perfectly, as perfect as Pete and Pickles!”
—Jean Ernst, Wild Rumpus, Minneapolis, MN

Santasaurus
by Niamh Sharkey (Candlewick)
“This tale of Christmas in Dinosaur Town is a fun—and affordable— book for both dino-lovers and all who enjoy fun illustrations.”
—Diana Portwood, Bob's Beach Books, Lincoln City, OR

Stitchin' and Pullin': A Gee's Bend Quilt
by Patricia McKissack, Cozbi A. Cabrera (illus.) (Random House Books for Young Readers)
“You’ll be immediately drawn in by this beautiful new book from Patricia McKissack that shows how ‘cloth has a memory,’ as a young girl learns a craft and the story of her family and ancestors. You’ll be hooked by the perfect illustrations.”
—Angela K Sherrill, 57th Street Books, Chicago, IL

The Origami Master
by Nathaniel Lachenmeyer, Aki Sogabe (illus.) (Albert Whitman & Co)
“This is a beautiful story about the true meaning of friendship. Aki Sogabe’s illustrations are strikingly beautiful and truly enhance the simple yet poignant text. Another plus is that the book contains directions for creating the origami bird featured in the story!”
—Carmen Slaughter, Yawn's Books & More, Canton, GA

The Snow Queen
by Hans Christian Andersen, adapted by Naomi Lewis, Christian Birmingham (illus) (Candlewick)
“The bewitching illustrations in this edition of the classic Hans Christian Andersen story of a friendship that endures over distance, time, and magical enchantments will lead you through dreamy, star-dusted skies and luminous gardens. This is a perfect gift for children or adults.”
—Victoria VanZile, Wild Rumpus, Minneapolis, MN

There Are Cats in This Book
by Viviane Schwarz (Candlewick)
“This is a fun, fun lift-the-flap book—and full of cats! Even non-cat-fans will like this one.”
—Diana Portwood, Bob's Beach Books, Lincoln City, OR

There's a Wolf at the Door: Five Classic Tales
by Zoe B. Alley, R.W. Alley (illus.) (Roaring Brook Press)
“The classic Wolf of the fairy tale world leads us through this jam-packed picture book. The five stories are told in a colorful comic book style that is well-suited to these fun stories.”
—Kat Goddard, The Bookloft, Great Barrington, MA

Too Many Toys
by David Shannon (Blue Sky Press)
“Spencer has too many toys and David Shannon’s wonderfully bold illustrations show us just how many. As Spencer decides which toys he can part with by putting them in a big empty box, he realizes that perhaps he can part with the toys, but the box, well, that’s another story. Children will relate to this humorous story.”
—Lisa Fabiano, Wellesley Booksmith, Wellesley, MA

Wally and Mae
by Christa Kempter, Frauke Weldin (illus.) (North-South)
“Wally the rabbit and Mae the bear couldn’t be more different. Wally is up early, neat, and industrious. Mae likes to sleep late and have fun. What happens when they live together will make readers laugh with delight. Beautiful illustrations add to this story of an unlikely friendship.”
—Barbara Katz, Harry W. Schwartz Bookshop, Mequon, WI

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Ages 9 to 12

Diary of a Wimpy Kid Do-It-Yourself Book
by Jeff Kinney (Amulet Books)
“Kinney’s newest book inspires kids to be funny and to see the humorous side of middle school awkwardness—and to realize they are not alone.”
—Marilyn Racette, Book Ends, Winchester, MA

Every Soul a Star
by Wendy Mass (Little, Brown Young Readers)
“This is the story of three kids, all at pivotal moments in their lives, who find themselves together in the middle of nowhere to see a once-in-a-lifetime solar eclipse. And only as they are forced together, and begin to contemplate the vastness of space, do they realize the significant role each of them has to play in the universe. Read this book!”
—Katie Capaldi, McLean & Eakin Booksellers, Petoskey, MI

Eyewitness Expert: Knight
by DK Publishing (DK Children)
“DK’s new Eyewitness Expert series features a mother lode of materials—charts, maps, Expert Files to log your finds, profile cards, and the amazing photography and vast information that DK is famous for. I have no doubt you and your child will know more than most professors after spending time with these Eyewitness Expert box sets, which also cover Ancient Egypt, Birds, Dinosaurs, and Rocks and Minerals.”
—Victoria VanZile, Wild Rumpus, Minneapolis, MN

Eyewitness Expert: Shark
by DK Publishing (DK Children)
“DK’s new Eyewitness Expert series features a mother lode of materials—charts, maps, Expert Files to log your finds, profile cards, and the amazing photography and vast information that DK is famous for. I have no doubt you and your child will know more than most professors after spending time with these Eyewitness Expert box sets, which also cover Ancient Egypt, Birds, Dinosaurs, and Rocks and Minerals.”
—Victoria VanZile, Wild Rumpus, Minneapolis, MN

Humpty Dumpty Jr., Hardboiled Detective: The Case of the Fiendish Flapjack Flop
by Nate Evans, Paul Hindman, Vincent Evans (Sourcebooks Jabberwocky)
“Move over Captain Underpants, Humpty Dumpty, Jr., Hardboiled Detective, is on the case. With his trusty sidekick, Humpty pursues the Fiendish Flapjack through New Yolk City, Queens (of Hearts), and to the Phoney Island Amusement Park. A punny adventure that’s irresistible for young readers, especially boys.”
—Laura DeLaney, The Rediscovered Bookshop, Boise, ID

Knucklehead: Tall Tales and Almost True Stories of Growing up Scieszka
by Jon Scieszka (Viking Juvenile)
“Knucklehead is an absolute scream, detailing the misadventures of Jon Scieszka and his five brothers growing up together. There are horrible Halloween costumes, broken bones, unbelievable nicknames, pee fights, weird Cub Scout rules, socks for birthday presents, and that’s just the beginning.”
—Sarah Todd, Children's Book World, Haverford, PA

Madame Pamplemousse and Her Incredible Edibles
by Rupert Kingfisher, Sue Hellard (illus.) (Bloomsbury)
“For Madeleine, life as a dishwasher in her uncle Lard’s restaurant is little more than dismal drudgery. But her fate may be about to change when she stumbles into a strange shop, where she meets the enigmatic Madame Pamplemousse, a culinary goddess whose incredible edibles leave the citizens of Paris clamoring for more. This is a unique, charming story.”
—Megan Graves, Hooray for Books!, Alexandria, VA

Mothstorm
by Philip Reeve (Bloomsbury USA Children's Books)
“When a rescue mission to Georgium Sidus yields a new foe, the Mumbys must save the Empire from certain peril—again. This thrilling and rewarding conclusion to Reeve’s Larklight trilogy is exactly what I wanted from this masterful storyteller.”
—Krys Tourtois, Schuler Books & Music, Lansing, MI

Swords: An Artist's Devotion
by Ben Boos (Candlewick)
“This illustrated celebration of swords and swordsmen is a true work of art—exploring the use of swords from ancient warriors to ninjas and samurais. (The focus is on the sword, not its uses.) Boos is a collector of swords and offers lavish details about their design and meaning.”
—Barbara Wilson, Butterfly Books, De Pere, WI

The Adventurous Deeds of Deadwood Jones
by Helen Hemphill (Front Street)
“A rip-roaring good time that is as fresh as it is nostalgic. This story of a young man searching for his father, a slave who was sold away from his family, opens a window into America’s past that most folks haven’t yet peered into!”
—Simone Bratcher, Bookin' It, Little Falls, MN

The Enchanted Collection Box Set: Ella Enchanted, The Two Princesses of Bamarre, Fairest
by Gail Carson Levine (HarperTrophy)
“Gail Carson Levine’s great Enchanted series is now together in a box set, with beautiful artwork.”
—Diana Portwood, Bob's Beach Books, Lincoln City, OR

The Gate of Days: The Book of Time II
by Guillaume Prevost (Arthur A. Levine Books)
“The second book in the Book of Time series takes Sam on an adventure through time, in which he must travel to find clues and ancient coins to rescue his dad, a prisoner of the original Count Dracula. Meanwhile, back in Sam’s own time, trouble is brewing. Mystery and murder make a great story that will have you anticipating the next book.”
—Ellen Perry, Browsing Bison Books, Deer Lodge, MT

The Lincolns: A Scrapbook Look at Abraham and Mary
by Candace Fleming (Schwartz & Wade)
“If you are looking for a nonfiction book on Abraham Lincoln, this is it. The scrapbook format—featuring actual photographs, newspaper clippings, handwritten letters, and drawings—makes this a very accessible book for the older elementary or middle school child. Fleming also provides an excellent bibliography for young readers and websites to learn more about the Lincolns.”
—Judy Hanley, Book Ends, Winchester, MA

The Runaway Dolls
by Ann M. Martin, Laura Godwin, and Brian Selznick (illus.) (Hyperion Books for Children)
“This story about a mysterious package and a dangerous adventure has been loved by everyone who has read it.”
—Rita F. Maggio, BookTowne, Manasquan, NJ

The Truth About Horses, Friends, & My Life as a Coward
by Sarah Gibson, Glin Dibley (illus.) (Marshall Cavendish Childrens Books)
“I laughed out loud as I read Sophie’s misadventures as she learns to overcome her (literal) downfalls and to juggle the challenges of learning about horses, and friends. An enjoyable book for horse lovers—and haters—it’s lots of fun.”
—Jennifer Hall, Partners Village Store, Westport, MA

The Unnameables
by Ellen Booraem (Harcourt Children's Books)
“The well-ordered, rigid home of foundling Medford Runyuin is an island called ‘Island’ because names should identify and usefulness is imperative. Feeling like an outcast, he struggles to conform until two very unconventional ‘stinky’ new friends enter his world and send everything awhirl. This is a marvelous tribute to change and creativity!”
—Kathy Carrigan, Harry W. Schwartz Bookshop, Brookfield, WI

Theodosia and the Staff of Osiris
by R. L. LaFevers (Houghton Mifflin)
“Once again, Theo battles the Serpents of Chaos, but this time she must contend with her grandmother’s determination to find her a suitable governess, some mysterious new artifacts at the museum, and an overly helpful assistant curator. Rarely does a sequel stand up as well as this one.”
—Sara Carter, Children's Bookshop, Kent, WA

White Sands, Red Menace
by Ellen Klages (Viking Juvenile)
“In the sequel to The Green Glass Sea, we find Dewey living with her friend Suze’s family in the aftermath of the atomic bomb. Suze’s dad works to develop rockets that will someday go to the moon, and her mom belongs to a scientists’ organization trying to limit the proliferation of weapons. Against this backdrop, both Suze and Dewey try to fit into small-town life, struggling to find where the smart girls fit in and to define their family. A fantastic sequel or an enjoyable stand-alone novel—take your pick!”
—Cathy Berner, Blue Willow Bookshop, Houston, TX

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Teen Readers

Dark Dude: A Novel
by Oscar Hijuelos (Atheneum)
“Rico doesn’t feel like he fits in too well in New York City. He’s a Cuban boy who looks and sounds white, his mother nags him and his father drinks too much. Running away to Wisconsin, Rico finds that he hasn’t managed to leave behind all the jerks or all the questions. However, he does find a community of teens, all dealing with issues of race, imperfect families, and how to use their talents to make a future.”
—Julie Leonard, Troubadour Books, Boulder, CO

Dishes
by Rich Wallace (Viking Juvenile)
“Dishes is a charming story of a young man spending his 19th summer working in a mostly gay resort town, trying to reconnect to a father who has been absent for most of his life—all the while trying to figure out exactly who he is. A great read!”
—Carol Schneck, Schuler Books & Music, Okemos, MI

Gamer Girl
by Mari Mancuso (Dutton Juvenile)
“After her parents’ divorce, a move away from her friends in Boston, and a horrific first day at her new school, Maddy seeks refuge in her manga and the game world of Fields of Fantasy, where she can be powerful, beautiful, and beat back the bullies with her spells. Mancusi handles the ups and downs of high school, family, and virtual reality with zest, uniting books and the online world in a fun-tastic novel.”
—Jenn Northington, The King's English, Salt Lake City, UT

Let It Snow: Three Holiday Stories
by John Green, Maureen Johnson, Lauren Myracle (Speak)
“These three interconnecting stories (by three of today’s most popular authors for teens) form a current and cozy teen read that is sweet but not sappy, romantic but not racy.”
—Kat Goddard, The Bookloft, Great Barrington, MA

Melting Stones
by Tamora Pierce (Scholastic Press)
“Evvy is an apprentice ‘stone mage’ who likes rocks better than people. But when she and her teacher find themselves trapped on an island with an emerging volcano, Evvy must find more strength than she’s ever dreamed of to save the people she has come to care about. Melting Stones is a wonderful coming-of-age story for anyone who has ever felt out of place or alone.”
—Sara Glassman, Little Professor Book Center, Homewood, AL

Need
by Carrie Jones (Bloomsbury USA Children's Books)
“Transplanted to Maine after her father’s death, Zara finds herself tangled up with an attractively dangerous pixie boy, a pack of were-creatures, and the risk of eternal imprisonment. It’s a page-turning story with real heft as Zara mourns, adapts to her new school, and navigates her fate.”
—Mark David Bradshaw, Watermark Books, Wichita, KS

Paper Towns
by John Green (Dutton Juvenile)
“Quentin has loved Margo since they were both nine years old. Now it’s the spring of their senior year, and after a night of pranks Margo disappears, leaving a solitary clue for Quentin. Both poignant and hysterical, this book is a delightful celebration of smart guys.”
—Cathy Berner, Blue Willow Bookshop, Houston, TX

The Possibilities of Sainthood
by Donna Freitas (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
“Antonia Lucia Labella, who lives with her family over their deli in Providence, Rhode Island, regularly writes to the Pope with petitions for new saints: the Patron Saint of the Kiss, the Patron Saint of Figs, and more. In each letter, she volunteers herself to become the first living saint in Catholic history. Clever and highly entertaining.”
—Cathy Berner, Blue Willow Bookshop, Houston, TX.

Spud-The Madness Continues...
by John van de Ruit (Sleuth RazorBill)
“The title says it all: Spud is back, and the madness does continue. The Crazy Eight dorm mates are back, and it’s another hysterically funny look into Spud’s diary as he returns to prep school. You don’t need to have read the first Spud to laugh out loud at this one.”
—Cathy Berner, Blue Willow Bookshop, Houston, TX

Suicide Notes: A Novel
by Michael Thomas Ford (HarperTeen)
“Everybody knows what 15-year-old Jeff did, but only he knows why. After being sent to a psychiatric ward, he struggles to convince the entire floor he doesn’t belong there. Only sessions with Dr. ‘Cat Poop’ will tell if he belongs with the rest of the ‘nuts.’”
—Tori Thompson, Booksmart, Morgan Hill, CA

The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation, Volume II: The Kingdom on the Waves
by M.T. Anderson (Candlewick)
“This historical novel transports the reader to the early days of America’s revolution. The future is open, everything is up in the air, and the hardest choice is one of loyalty: Should Octavian fight for the rebels who want to keep him a slave, or should he follow hope and side with the royalists who promise him personal freedom? Anderson’s sequel to his award-winning The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing is a provocative story that continues to enlarge the young adult novel in thoughtful, glorious ways.”
—Mark David Bradshaw, Watermark Books, Wichita, KS

The Good Neighbors, Book One: Kin
by Holly Black, Ted Naifeh (Graphix)
“The story centers on Rue, a troubled teen, whose mother has recently disappeared and whose father has been acting strangely ever since. And, if this isn’t enough, Rue starts to see weird beings, with horns and wings and animal heads—the faerie world. This is a fabulous start to a new series, and the book’s drawings are startling images of a world where nothing is quite what it seems.”
—Angela Mann, Kepler's Books & Magazine, Menlo Park, CA

Wondrous Strange
by Lesley Livingston (HarperTeen)
“When Kelley gets to perform in her dream role, Titania, in her dream city, New York, it seems as if all her dreams will come true. In a twist of fate that would make Shakespeare himself proud, Kelley is thrown into a plot with real faeries in an all-too-real struggle for power right in the middle of Central Park. What with the gorgeous stranger who seems to be following her and the horse who is living on Lucky Charms in her bathtub, when will she ever get her lines memorized?”
—Mara Lynn Luther, Chapter One Book Store, Hamilton, MT